Copywriting Tip: Make Your Content Upbeat and Inviting

Upbest copywritingWith all the information available to you online, you’ve probably read numerous articles, sales pages, and e-books. Notice anything different from one piece to the next – even when they’re on the same topic or promoting the same product/service?

I’m referring to the different tones used or the moods set in the writing style used by the author or copywriter. Simply by changing a few words or adding punctuation and pauses, a writer can change how you – the reader – feel about what you’re reading.

Take a look at the marketing materials that you ask your prospects and/or clients to read. Do you think they’re too serious, businesslike or ‘heavy?’ If so, take these copywriting tips into consideration when writing your next piece.

Here are 4 pointers to help you make your content colorful, upbeat and enticing:

1. Don’t assume.

When writing copy, avoid wrapping your content in a veil of secrecy. Being mysterious is fine for fortune tellers, but it doesn’t always work with writers. Write clearly in a light, unassuming tone of voice – as if the person you’re writing to is just across the table from you.

2. Use humor, when appropriate.

Humor is very nearly a universal language. This means that, with the right words, you can affect the way people see things, bring a smile to their face or cause them to laugh out loud.

However, I say use humor when appropriate because depending on your product/service and your target market, you may need to approach them on a sincere level. Always keep your audience in mind and speak to them accordingly.

When it is appropriate and you want your copy to be upbeat and fun, go ahead and inject humor into your writing. Be lively and write with enthusiasm.

3. Don’t overdo it.

One of my blog posts was about KISS – keep it simple sweetheart.

To keep the mood of your content upbeat and inviting, don’t exert too much effort into impressing your readers with sophisticated language. They want to be informed and perhaps, entertained – not bewildered or confused.


4. You can’t please all the people all the time. Don’t try.

There is no way your writing will to appeal to every reader. Not even the best and brightest writers have been able to do that.

Can you imagine if horror master Stephen King wrote a romance novel in the style of Harlequin books? Probably not. Writers will always have their own styles and a segment of the audience who admire them.

To keep your copy upbeat and inviting, avoid trying to cover several genres or styles of writing in one piece. Whether you’re writing a brochure, sales page, blog post or article, stick to a tone of voice that is the best vehicle for the message you want to share.

Do you use one or all four of these tips when writing your copy? Have one you’d like to add? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below because I’d love to hear from you. Thanks a million and here’s to your sweet success.

Debra Jason

Marketing & writing with heart, not hype at at The Write Direction
A recipient of the “Creative Person of the Year” award, Debra educates and empowers creative solopreneurs and enthusiastic business owners to create a lifestyle business that provides them with the flexibility, fun and freedom to do what they love. She also inspires you to communicate your marketing message in a way that captivates and converts your prospects into loyal, raving fans - even if you have been struggling with how to transform your ideas into words in the past.

Comments

  1. It is funny. When we are writing content, we think that we are writing ‘upbeat’, but as soon as we are the receiver of content, we immediately see when someone is a ‘try hard’

    God article! 🙂

  2. I love all your tips, but I think “Don’t overdo it,” resonates with me the most. The simplest message is often the most effective, and unfortunately, I think a lot of mediocre writing tends to be overly complicated.

    I can’t tell you how often I’ve read something where I thought, “Now what does that word mean?” Only to look it up and think, “Wow, they could have used this simple word to mean the same thing. All they’ve done is complicate the message.”

    Humor is another spot where I think writing can go downhill fast. I agree with you that humor is universal, and I hate when writing feels stiff and overly professional, but humor varies so much across cultures/languages/groups that it has to be used carefully, as you mentioned.

    Great post Debra — thanks for writing it!

    • Hi Adam, thanks a million for stopping by. Everything you say is spot on. I used to suggest staying away from humor when selling because buying is serious business. However, I think you have to have a knack for that style of writing and absolutely, pay attention to your audience. You want to resonate with, not offend your prospects.
      And KISS (keep it simple sweetheart) is always high on my list. Appreciate you sharing your thoughts here.
      Debra Jason recently posted…On Black Friday Was Your Inbox As Stuffed As Your Belly On Thanksgiving?My Profile

  3. Thanks for sharing some great tips, Debra. I’ve learned to be more careful about choosing words that may not be as exact in meaning, but are easier for most to understand. Sometimes I still mess up there. One suggestion I would add is to write from the reader’s perspective, particularly if it’s a marketing message or one intended to persuade. So often I see content that is all about features and benefits or company priorities without any thought as to what might compel the intended audience to do something (preferably by design). It’s always great to read your posts as they prompt me to consider what I’m really doing (vs. what I think I’m doing). Thanks!
    Nanette Levin recently posted…Preparing edible perennials & fall plantings for winterMy Profile

    • So true Nanette, it’s important to keep your prospect/customer in mind – what does he/she need? In marketing it’s not really about the product, but what the product does for your prospects. The message has to resonate with them. Someone buying a gym membership is making the purchase because they want to be in better shape, improve their health, etc.
      I’m glad you find my posts thought-provoking and appreciate you taking the time to share your comments here. Thanks a million!
      Debra Jason recently posted…Three Reasons Why Apologizing to Your Customers FailsMy Profile

  4. Thanks for sharing this. I often try to write funny copy and then delete it in editing because its hard to know if my sense of humor will come across appropriately for the client. I respect those who are able to write funny copy.

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